Keep Your Cushing’s Dog Hydrated

When warm months are upon us, it’s important to be mindful of a dog’s water intake. Since Cushing’s dogs are prone to symptoms like excessive thirst, it’s especially important to care for your pup’s hydration when the weather gets hot.

Foods that Hydrate

Since a whole food diet or a kibble diet with whole food additions can be beneficial for a Cushing’s dog, it’s easy to add in foods that are also hydrating. This comes in the form of fruits and veggies.

Watery fruits and veggies like cucumber and watermelon can be a delicious and hydrating treat for a dog. Remove the seeds and rind, then let your pup chow down. Other fruits and veggies that pack on the hydrating power are apples, other melons like cantaloupe, and leafy greens. Berries are great too and can be served frozen plain or mixed with yogurt for a pup pop. Just remember, no grapes. They can cause kidney problems for pups.

Water Access

According to Petmd.com, “Providing access to an abundance of clean, cool water is critical.” It’s easy to set a bowl out for pups staying outside, but if the water if left to heat in the sun, it’s not as appealing to your dog. Keeping water refreshed is important too. Try a bowl that recirculates water to help you manage your pup’s supply.

Work Hydration into Play

Give your pup an icy treat by filling a toy with water and freezing it. Add an element of play and hydration beyond ice cubes by using puzzle or regular chew toys for this. Petmd.com also suggests freezing a dog treat in the middle of an ice cube for a fun and hydrating surprise.

Keeping dogs cool in the heat goes a long way to preventing dehydration. Incorporate kiddie pools or sprinklers into your outdoor time in the summer, especially if your pup spends time outdoors on a regular basis. Toss balls or other toys into the kiddie pool and let your dog fish them out! They’ll cool off and gulp a bit of water in the process.

Cleaning Safety for Dog Owners

Keeping a clean home is important, but certain products can cause pet parents’ concern. Irritated eyes and skin, as well as breathing problems could be the result of cleaning products according to PetMD.com. You can keep your pup safe and maintain a healthy, happy home by keeping a few tips for cleaning safety for dog owners in mind.

1. Keep Products Out of Reach

Just like kids, pets are at risk from discovering and using products without supervision. That’s why it’s best to put chemicals away in a pet-safe place. Are low cabinets the only option? Using kiddie locks may not be a bad idea to keep your pups out. Make sure no dog items are stored in the same area.

2. Check Product Labels

Some products will tell you specifically whether they’re pet-safe or not. However, the best bet is always to follow instructions from the manufacturer and be vigilant.

If you’re not sure about a product, err on the side of caution and don’t use it unless you consult your vet. Some fumes can be harmful for dogs, making it best to avoid certain products. This doesn’t mean always going natural is the safest route either. Essential oils can be harmful for pups as well, according to the American Kennel Club.

3. Keep Doggy Away

The best approach when cleaning an area is to make sure your pup can’t get near until everything is dry. Make sure your dog’s toys and bowls are safely out of the way of sprays and fumes too. You could even work cleaning your pup’s items into your routine. While everything dries, it’s the perfect time to take a walk so you can both enjoy some fresh air.

4. Pay Special Attention to Your Dog’s High-Touch Areas

If your pup is known to take a sip from the toilet bowl or if he likes to lick the floors in your kitchen, then plan on being really choosy with your cleaning products in those areas. Air fresheners are best avoided in general as they can lead to irritation in any part of the house.

5. Consider Using Your Own Simple Solution

Vinegar, baking soda, and water go a long way to clean surfaces. Mixed in a 1 to 1 ratio, a vinegar/water solution can be sprayed on counters or used to mop floors. Baking soda can be used to clean your toilet or sinks, or even sprinkled on laundry to freshen odors instead of using heavily scented detergents.

Protect Your Dog from the Heat

Summer time is a great time for play with longer days and more recreation time. For pups as well as humans, the glaring heat can also be a danger. To avoid heat stroke in dogs, practice play smarts by planning the best times and ways to enjoy the outdoors, hydrating, and knowing when to cut things short for a panting pooch.

Cushing’s dogs need exercise in moderation and getting out for a walk is important, but in the summer months, heat stroke in dogs is a real concern. Keep your dog cool with some fun and simple changes in your routine.

1. Swim Time

If you don’t have your own pool, finding an inexpensive kiddie pool and filling it up can be a fun playtime for your pooch. They might even be more likely to jump into a smaller pool just to splash their feet. You can toss rubber toys in to entice them. Just make sure your dog can step over the lip of the pool without straining. Just remember, like kids, dogs need supervision at all times in a pool.

2. Cold Dog Treats

Ice cream for dogs? Sure. Frozen peanut butter or meat? That can work too. Even plain old ice can do the trick. You can make it extra fun with molds that freeze food into shapes for Fido. Round molds will double as a ball toy. Yogurt is a perfect treat to add into the mix as it will do wonders for the digestive system.

PetMD.com recommends watermelon, blueberries, and cantaloupe as three of the ten best fruits for dogs. All could be blended and mixed into ice molds with or without yogurt or just served up in sweet, cold chunks.

3. Hydrate Against Heatstroke

Unlike their human besties, dogs often don’t know when to stop, so you’re their number one safeguard for protecting against heat stroke. Doctor Steven Berkowitz told Dogster.com, the online companion to the former Dog Fancy magazine, that “dogs are often too loyal to stop playing with you even if they’re starting to get overheated and tired.”

The key is to make sure your dog drinks often from a source of cool water. Be careful of leaving dishes or other containers of stagnant water out in the heat, as bacteria and insects can become a concern. Instead, consider buying a stainless-steel faucet adapter that can be used outdoors. You can also find filtering pet fountains that are safe for both indoor and outdoor use. Some suggest dogs even prefer drinking from running water more than stagnant water. Savvy pet owners have even hacked a DIY version if you’re looking to cut costs or have a fun project.

No matter what your outdoor activity, watch your pet for any signs that they are overheated, as their health can rapidly deteriorate if not corrected. Dogster.com lists 6 common signs of heat stroke in dogs that you should be on the lookout for.

– Rapid Panting
– Thick/Sticky Saliva
– Bright Red Tongue
– Weakness
– Diarrhea
– Vomiting

Enjoy time outside with your pooch, just make sure to beat the heat with breaks and water. Save longer times of outdoor play for cooler hours in the morning or evening when extended walks or runs are best. Whatever you choose, we hope you savor the season.